The Dream of the Red Chamber Symposium

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The San Francisco Opera has commissioned the creation of an opera based on The Dream of the Red Chamber, the most important Chinese novel, scheduled to have its world premiere in the fall of 2016

The symposium will feature 3 events:

Roundtable Discussion
4:30pm – June 29, 2015 (Monday)

Creative Team In-depth
4:30pm  – July 1, 2015 (Wednesday)

The Dream of the Red Chamber Preview
5:30pm – July 1, 2015 (Wednesday)

The Dream of the Red Chamber Symposium
Date: 29 June – July 1, 2015
Venue: Multipurpose Hall, Cheng Yu Tung Building, HKUST
Tickets: Free register for tickets here

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Cheung Chau Bun Festival

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Cheung Chau Bun Festival (22-26 May 2015)
It all started with a plague that devastated Cheung Chau in the late Qing dynasty (1644–1911). The islanders built an altar in front of the Pak Tai Temple and petitioned the god Pak Tai to drive off the evil spirits besieging the island, while parading statues of deities through the narrow lanes of their village. The plague ended after the performance of these Taoist rituals and 100 years later the rituals are still performed in a festival that is listed as an intangible part of China’s cultural heritage.

The 2-day event includes Taoist ceremonies, Piu Sik Parade and the Bun Scrambling Competition involving three massive towers of buns.

Piu Sik Parade (2-4pm, 25 May 2015)
The highlight of the festival is the Piu Sik (Floating Colours) Parade. A reenactment of the ceremonial parade held to drive away a plague a century ago sees young children, dressed in the guises of traditional deities and modern celebrities, balance on poles and accompanied by gongs and lion dancers, appearing to float above the crowds in a carnival-like procession.

Bun Scrambling Competition (11:30pm 25 May – 12:30am 26 May, 2015)
Opposite the Pak Tai Temple, competitors stand poised at the bottom of an enormous bamboo tower studded with imitation buns. On the signal, they scramble up it and try to collect as many “lucky buns” as possible. The higher the buns, the more points they are worth.

Cheung Chau Bun Festival
Date: 25 May, 2015
Venue:  Cheung Chau

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Hong Kong Para-rowing Team Wins 4 Gold Medals at World Indoor Rowing Championships

Tsoi Ka Ming

The Hong Kong Para-rowing team won 4 Gold, 3 Silver and 1 Bronze Medals at the 4th INAS World Indoor Rowing Championships, 2nd INAS International Regatta and 9th International Para-Rowing Regatta at Gavirate, Italy on the 14-17 May, 2015.

At the 4th INAS World Indoor Rowing Championships Para-rower, Tsoi Ka Ming won the Gold medal at the Men’s Individual 500m event and broke the world record in 01:29.2, he has also capture the Silver medal in Men’s Individual 1000m event. While Lee Wai Yi and Liu Wang Sin swept the 2 Gold and 2 Silver medals in the Women Individual 500m and 1000m respectively.

LTA Mixed Coxed Four  1000m_At the 2nd INAS International Regatta, after a year of hard training, Hong Kong’s Para-rowing Team (Intellectual Disabled crew) won Gold medal in LTA mixed coxed four event.

The Hong Kong Para-rowing Team (Physically Disabled crew) also attended a 10 days intensive training camp organized by the FISA (International Rowing Federation) at the same venue. The Para-rowers, Chan Ka Man and Yau Chi Choi Daniel brought home a one Bronze medal in LTA Mixed Double Sculls event while, the silver medalist in recent Sydney International Rowing Regatta, Ajmal Victor Samuel was placed fifth among 24 countries in the AS Men’s Single Sculls event.

Liu Wang Sin_Lee Wai YiSource: Hong Kong, China Rowing Association
Editing: bc magazine

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Ride of Silence

Ride-of-Silence-2013---HK_About_to_leave_the_clock_tower,_large-by_Daniel_YM_Chan

Ride of Silence
Date:
 7:15pm, 20 May, 20015
Venue: Tsim Sha Tsui Promenade, Clock Tower
Tickets: Free
More info:
10th Annual Ride of Silence, Hong Kong cyclists will ride quietly together in memory of others killed and injured on our roads. The ride is also meant to serve as a reminder that cyclists are legitimate road users and deserve respect and consideration.
Event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/825632214139435/

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Anodyne Attempt to Rewrite History

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The ‘Umbrella Festival’ opened today at the JCCAC in Shep Kip Mei. You’ll have noticed the inverted commas I put around the festival name, yes the festival poster is yellow and has an umbrella on it – but that’s about all the ‘festival’ has in common with 2014’s umbrella protests. When one of the festival’s curator’s Prof. Katrien Jacobs stands on stage and starts joking about making her speech notes on a post-it like on the Lennon Wall before continuing with “As a foreigner I found the protests sexy and fun and that’s what we want to do with this festival, keep the fun going…”

The Umbrella Festival is an anaemic poorly conceived joke. An insult to the HongKongers who stood up for their beliefs and voiced a desire for Universal Suffrage to precipitate the removal of the morally corrupt politicians and civil servants who are destroying the Hong Kong we love and call home with their arse-licking of the mainland amidst the lining of their own pockets.

The JCCAC is an interesting space and there are mini-exhibits and photos spread over it’s 9 floors. I didn’t see the words universal suffrage anywhere, not a single mention about the underlying reasons for the protest. Not a mention of the police violence – there was one photo of the tear gas. The only comment about police violence was in a theatrical piece by FM Theatre Power (see video) that was part of the opening ceremony, but even that was tempered when the police become ‘caring mothers’ and embraced the demonstrators.

There is a mini-Lennon wall – but no explanation of the what it symbolized or how it got started… You can add you own post-it, but the ones already posted were banal and safe, as were the chalk drawings. For ‘fun’ as Professor Jacobs described it, get a poster and walk around to get ‘umbrella’ stamps at different parts of the building…

Another of the curators claims as they opened the festival was to celebrate the Umbrella protests art… the protest zones were vibrant artistic and discoursive hubs with new things being created and revealed everyday. Yet almost none of that is here, why not?

There are some interesting close-up photos – but no photos which show the scale or size of the protests. In fact I couldn’t find an exhibit which even explained that there were three protest zones.

What could have been a fascinating examination of the protests and the art that emerged over the 79 days instead reeks of a government funded snow job, an attempt to rewrite one of the seminal moments in Hong Kong’s history.

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