Ex-Croall; McEwen by Antonio Stradivari

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Ahead of it’s auction at Sotheby’s Galleries London in March, the Ex-Croall; McEwen violin crafted by Antonio Stradivari in 1684 is being showcased around the world.

One of only about 500 surviving Stradivaris and valued at over $12million local violinist Vincent Chua demonstrated the Stradivari’s beautiful sound by performing God Save the Queen variation by Paganini

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I Hate Hamlet!

To be or not to be – that is the question facing celebrity TV actor Andrew Rally (Hamish Campbell). To be Hamlet in a prestigious production in New York’s Central Park, or not to be Hamlet and stick to what he knows best – phone-it-in acting on a cheesy but popular TV show.

His girlfriend (Kate Mulligan) and his agent (Kath O’Connor) want him to take the role; his Hollywood buddy (Mike Pizzuto) and real-estate agent (Jane Archibald) do not. As for Andrew, he’s just not sure he’s capable of the Bard. Plus he’s seriously worried about the slings and arrows of outraged critics!

Enter the ghost of John Barrymore (Neville Sarony), dressed in high Shakespearean garb and determined to help Andrew fulfill his actor’s destiny. What a piece of work is Barrymore! Noble in reason and infinite in faculty, and yet Andrew remains suspicious that Barrymore may smile and smile and be a villain.

Playwright Paul Rudnick had the idea for I Hate Hamlet! when he lived in John Barrymore’s apartment in New York in the late 1980s. This Hong Kong Players production is directed by Jodi Gilchrist.

So, what’s a man to do? It’s said that all the world’s a stage and each must play his part… the question is, which part?

Cast
Andrew Rally – Hamish Campbell
John Barrymore – Neville Sarony
Deirdre McDavey – Kate Mulligan
Lillian Troy – Kath O’Connor
Felicia Dantine – Jane Archibald
Gary Lefkowitz – Mike Pizzuto

Director: Jodi Gilchrist
Assistant Director: Sarah Kidd

I Hate Hamlet!
Hong Kong Players
Date: 1-4 March, 2017
Venue: Fringe Club, Fringe Underground
Tickets: $280 from www.art-mate.net

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Bon Appétit! – Macau Fringe Festival

Entitled A Feast of Creativity! Bon Appétit! and adopting the concept “All around the city, our stages, our patrons, our artists”, the 16th Macau Fringe Festival looks to offer an arts banquet for an entire city.

2017’s banquet includes a hairdresser’s salon turned into a musical. A recreation of an entertainment house at Beco da Felicidade and a funeral at the Ruins of St. Paul’s in the middle of the night. Organized by the Cultural Affairs Bureau, The Macau Fringe Festival runs from 13 to 22 January 2017 and features 23 programmes at multiple venues.

Zuò Zuò Tea House reveals the solitude and secrets of Rua da Felicidade by combining elements of dance and music and digging into the history of Macau’s red-light district. Mobile Kitchen invites people from the cultural field to take the role of chefs and share their cuisine, whether refined or homely, and encourage the public to savour the flavour of life.

In Antiwords, produced by Czech Republic Spitfire Company, two actresses drink beer after beer, bragging and arguing in an explosive mix of nonsensical humour and imagination. Circolando’s Night which debuts on the first day of the Festival features a trio of men who through their intensely physical and emotional expression ask questions of language and aesthetics.

In Good Hands, by Catherine Ireton, is a live musical set in a hairdressing salon about secrets and trust. The Magnificent 4 uses the human body as an instrument and a choreography that makes use of the legs and hand-clapping in creating a unique tempo.

In 5 Women, Dutch choreographer Kevin Pollak joins hands with five dancers at a birthday party set in a café where, through dance and movement, secrets that cannot be shared emerge. The Smooth Life is a puppet show set to Arabian music that tells the true story of the life of the director Husam Abed in a Palestinian refugee camp.

Funeral for the Living, directed by Daisuke Sagawa and performed by Japanese company Theatre Moments, debates issues of life and death. While The Other Side of the Sacred produced by Macao choreographer Candy Kuok in cooperation with Nina Dipla takes the audience on a journey that mixes dance, poetry and music.

In Weaving Landscape: Night Tide, the Associação de Arte e Cultura – Comuna de Pedra use different materials as a medium of creativity, making use of body language and installation art to explore the relationship between body, fabrics and all living things.

There’s also a range of extended programmes including Thematic talks: Foreign Theatre – Body, Memory and Labour and Fringe Reviews 2017, where artists and performing groups in different fields will share their creation experiences. For the full programme see www.macaucityfringe.gov.mo, tickets are on sale now from Macauticket.

Macau Fringe Festival
Date: 13-22 January 2017
Venue: various
Tickets: MacauTicket
More info: www.macaucityfringe.gov.mo

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The Hong Kong Three Sisters World Premiere @ HK Cultural Centre – 6 January, 2017

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The World Premiere of Alice Theatre Laboratory‘s The Hong Kong Three Sisters took place at the HK Cultural Centre’s Studio Theatre on the 6 January, 2017.
Click on any photo or here for the full gallery of images

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The Hong Kong Three Sisters

The emptiness of Hong Kong people’s life will go naked in Alice Theatre Laboratorys anatomy of Chekhov’s The Three Sisters. The Hong Kong Three Sisters is a highly localised fusion of Hong Kong and the essence of the classic Russian play.

Adapted by Director Andrew Chan who commented “There is a glimpse of hope shown in Chekhov’s characters’ minds. In contrast, our life in Hong Kong has lost its balance in recent years, there is a lack of direction within the region and the things people used to strive for are realistically now beyond them.”

“Modern Hong Kong is the backdrop to this creative interpretation” continued Chan, “Chekhov captured the average Russian’s lifestyle a century ago.” Seasoned by minimalism, The Hong Kong Three Sisters is ‘molecular gastronomic dish’, which is the sublimation of Chekhov’s ideas in a post-modern presentation devised by Chan or as he puts it “A “molecular” presentation that aims to reveal the status quo of the Hong Kong people today.”

Ahead of it’s World Premiere in January bc magazine spoke to Director Andrew Chan and actress Chan Shui Yu (Olga/Alice) about the new minimalist production.

Director Andrew Chan

Why did you choose a minimalist approach to the play?
From time to time, there is discussion among directors in Hong Kong about using a bare stage or very few props. They are regarded as minimalists. I have been wondering whether this artistic approach, which originated in the 60s and 70s, is that simple. German architect Ludwig Miles van der Rohe says, “Less is more.” I have been thinking over how much means “less” and how much means “more”. I like learning new ideas and believe the world of knowledge has no borders. That is why I take every project or performance as a learning opportunity, which lets me wander on a theatrical journey among different artistic forms and styles. This journey is an expedition in the realm of “minimalism”.

What attracted you to Chekov’s The Three Sisters?
“Minimalism is Talent’s sister.” This is what Russian novelist and playwright Anton Chekhov once said. Owing to this quotation, I linked minimalism with his works and read them again. In terms of conciseness, his novellas are the best. In his condensed writings, the ordinary, vulgar and deplorable life in the Tsardom of Russia is vividly revealed. Each story is a picture illustrating the joy and sorrow of life.

My favourite Chekhov’s play is actually The Seagull. Yet, The Three Sisters touches me more deeply. Irina’s line “Moscow! Moscow! Moscow!” reminds me of the current situation in Hong Kong. The Three Sisters is a story before the October Revolution when people are facing the fall of the Empire and expecting the arrival of a new era.

They are like waiting in the dark before dawn and braving the great change with an anonymous pain in the heart. Aren’t we, Hong Kong people who are nostalgic for the “good old days”, facing various difficulties and braving the unforeseeable tomorrow? More than a century ago, the Russian three sisters could dream of Moscow, but now what can we dream of? Where can we go?

How Did The Hong Kong Three Sisters Evolve?
In the process of rehearsal, new ideas emerged and the play has evolved and branched out into the life of Hong Kong stage actors after they take their costumes off. There are a property agent, a podcast anchor of a conspiracy forum, an assistant professor of the Medicine Faculty, a tour guide and a spiritual counselor who are meeting different Hong Kong people with different problems. Their stories are actually like novellas which resemble the works by the contemporary American novelist Raymond Carver, who is known as “the American Chekhov”. Without redundant structure, his concise language leads readers to the core of the story directly and lets them experience the tension of the conflict that elicits no background nor ending. Only the selected part of the story is told. On our stage, there will be a few scenes like Carver’s novellas, illustrating no pretext nor resolution, but the very moment.

What Makes The Hong Kong Three Sisters Unique?
What makes The Hong Kong Three Sisters different from our previous productions is the way it lets you “escape” from reality but makes you “face” the reality. It is also dealing with complicated issues in a minimalist form.

Chan Shui Yu

What Attracts You to The Three Sisters
As a graduate from HKAPA, I am excited about the opportunity to perform classical plays, let alone the challenge of adapting a masterpiece, such as Chekhov’s The Three Sisters. From character analysis to adaptation, it has been a beautiful and pleasant journey. Like our previous performances, which were created by ensemble effort, this production is telling stories in a unique, organic and realistic way.

What parallels do you see between the play and Hong Kong today?
It was touching to read the script of Chekhov’s The Three Sisters as the story illustrates exactly Hong Kong’s environment and situation today. Even if we are proud of the good old days, we still need to carry on with best wishes. We believe the best is yet to come and our effort today will pay in the future and pave the way for our next generation.

Do you think that women today in Hong Kong face the same problems as those in Chekov’s time?
Chekhov’s works are universal. It seems women enjoy more freedom nowadays but still the women today are facing the same issues related to family, marriage, love and work like the women in the old days. We find the women today as strong and determined as the ones in The Three Sisters.

Chekhov’s works mainly deal with the social issues in Russia in the late 19th century, including the rise of businessmen, the fall of landlords and the social status before the October Revolution. In the meantime, his works also reveal the absurdity of the world today, the anxiety of our current life and the collapse of the old values. However, there is always hope in his works and the characters project an optimistic sense. His characters are stranded in the midst of joy and sorrow but still carry on bravely.

Through the play Chekov presents various opinions about what it is to live a good life. What do you think living a good life for a HK woman looks like today?
We would also like to find out the answer. Olga says in Act 4, “If only we knew, if only we knew!” But it is certain that we are all positive.

Character List
OlgaAlice  Chan Shui Yu
VershininKwong – Chau Ka Fai
AndreiAugust – Leung Chi Chung Eric
TuzenbachDamon – Lai Ho Yin Desmond
MashaSue – Fung Siu Shan Phoebe
NatashaHilda – Yuen Wai Ying Grace
IrinaKitty – Chan Hui Yan Candy

Director: Chan Hang Fai Andrew
Playwright: Anton ChekhovDevised by Alice Theatre Laboratory

The Hong Kong Three Sisters
Alice Theatre Laboratory
When:
6-8 January, 2017
Where: HK Cultural Centre, Studio Theatre
How much: $200, $160 from Urbtix
More info:
Cantonese drama with Chinese and English surtitles
6–7 Jan, 2017 – 8pm
7–8 Jan, 2017 – 3pm

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The Hong Kong Three Sisters

The emptiness of Hong Kong people’s life will go naked in Alice Theatre Laboratory’s anatomy of Chekhov’s The Three Sisters. The Hong Kong Three Sisters is a highly localised fusion of Hong Kong and the essence of the classic Russian play that has it’s World Premiere in January 2017.

Adapted by Director Andrew Chan who commented “There is a glimpse of hope shown in Chekhov’s characters’ minds. In contrast, our life in Hong Kong has lost its balance in recent years, there is a lack of direction within the region and the things people used to strive for are realistically now beyond them.”

“Modern Hong Kong is the backdrop to this creative interpretation” continued Chan, “Chekhov captured the average Russian’s lifestyle a century ago.” Seasoned by minimalism, The Hong Kong Three Sisters is ‘molecular gastronomic dish’, which is the sublimation of Chekhov’s ideas in a post-modern presentation devised by Chan or as he puts it “A “molecular” presentation that aims to reveal the status quo of the Hong Kong people today.”

The Hong Kong Three Sisters is also the concluding production of the Theatrical Minimalism Exploration Project, which has conducted a series of seminars, workshops and showcases examining minimalism in detail over the last two years. The production explores Minimalist Theatre through disintegrating and reassembling a masterpiece in the post-modern approach with the injection of naturalistic performance, Brecht’s alienation effect and the imagery language of the stage.

Presented by Alice Theatre Laboratory (ATL) and financially supported by the Arts Capacity Development Funding Scheme of the Government of the HKSAR, The Hong Kong Three Sisters will première in the Studio Theatre of Hong Kong Cultural Centre before touring Asia and Europe between May and September 2017.

Cast: Chan Shui Yu, Chau Ka Fai, Leung Chi Chung Eric, Lai Ho Yin Desmond, Fung Siu Shan Phoebe, Yuen Wai Ying Grace and Chan Hui Yan Candy

Director: Chan Hang Fai Andrew
Playwright: Anton ChekhovDevised by Alice Theatre Laboratory

The Hong Kong Three Sisters
Alice Theatre Laboratory
When:
 6-8 January, 2017
Where: HK Cultural Centre, Studio Theatre
How much: $200, $160 from Urbtix
More info:
Cantonese drama
6–7 Jan, 2017 – 8pm
7–8 Jan, 2017 – 3pm

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Vishal Nanda: Writer, Game Designer and Peel Street Poet

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Vishal Nanda is a writer and spoken word performer, as well as an indie game designer, teacher, and editor. He spends his time writing poetry, scripts, screen plays, plays, short stories, novels and the like, as he cannot quite help himself.

Recently, he hosted an event with acclaimed novelist Omar Musa during Hong Kong’s Literary Festival and his poetry has been published in the literary journal Asia Cha. He has performed spoken word poetry at a variety of events, including TEDx Wanchai, comedy shows, fundraisers and on RTHK Radio Three. He can usually be found nervously performing In Lan Kwai Fong most Wednesdays at Orange Peel with the other Peel Street Poets.

How long have you been involved in poetry?
I’ve been writing sort of poetry since I was thirteen, if you could call what I used to write ‘poetry’. It would be more accurate to say that I was trying to write poetry. I am hesitant to call what I write poetry, or to call myself a poet.

It’s quite a grandiose declaration because for good or ill ‘poetry’ still has pretentious connotations. If we had another word for it in English, with the sense that you’re part of a rather large group of aspiring writers maybe in training, that could excise the pretence from the term, like writing ‘pooms’, then that would be more accurate.

Writing pooms was a solo thing for a long time, completely devoid of connection to a larger community, till I ‘joined’ Peel Street. Since then I’ve been writing far more than I have in the past, with far more opportunities to get read or listened to, so in terms of dedicating more time to poetry, I would have to say since joining Peel, which was about three years ago. Since then I’ve been lucky to have more opportunities to write and perform, and it all started with Peel.

Where do you get the inspiration for your writing?
This is a crazy question. It would be hard enough to answer if you were referring to one specific piece I’ve written, let alone for writing as a whole. What was I thinking at the time? What series of events throughout my entire life, my childhood, all the media I have ever consumed, led to me producing that piece of work? How did I have the time to do it? What was I feeling back when I wrote it?

There’s a way to bypass the question entirely, and the assumption behind it, of the creator having agency in the cause. People are computers who take input, all the input our gloriously unique minds are capable of taking as the most powerful processing machines in the known universe, and then output something, like dick in the box, or Game of Thrones, or poetry. Although we have agency in the process we are far from objective observers of that process.

That said, if I had to give a tidier answer then I would abide by something Neil Gaiman said, which I paraphrase as ‘You walk by a dozen stories everyday. A writer notices at least five of them.’ In other words, there are stories and ideas everywhere, and it’s a matter of observation both internally and externally to recognise them.

And although I’m saying there is a lack of agency I don’t think there is a lack of craft. I use Evernote for everything, which means I can write on my phone, my Ipad, my desktop, whatever, it all goes to the same place, and if I have an idea I write it down, I file it away, whether I’m walking or sitting at home. I think there are two extremes for me when it comes to how I end up writing something, with a lot in the middle. I want to emphasise that I’m an amateur.

On the grandscale of global writers I’m just another guy on the cliff hoping to make his way up, but I think there’s some value then in telling you my work ethic, of the method in attempting to climb the cliff because it’s probably similar to a lot of other people who are trying but haven’t quite made it. I write all my ideas down. Sometimes I’ll have an abstract idea that I need to craft into a story- I had one about how children and what might be considered ‘the delusional’ have a lot in common, but how do I contain that in an actual narrative?

So I try to build something, which sometimes takes time, it takes outlines and planning and experimentation and editing. Or I had one about a guy who was ‘time displaced’ and could feel the past of any place he was at and I run with the idea, I imagine being that character and I take the story to it’s logical conclusions.

I don’t believe in writer’s block, my rule is that if I can’t figure out a problem, I’m only allowed to quit if I’ve sat in front of a desk and stared at the page for half an hour to an hour and truly come up with nothing, which I honestly think is a rarity. I try to abide by that rule.

On the other hand, especially with poetry, I’ve found that moments where I’m really emotional, often negatively, at those times writing out a poem is therapy, an itch, I have to get it out there because I feel like I’m going crazy, it’s like taking the chaos of an unformed internal monologue and shaping it into something, and times like those are times where it just flows out in one go.

So it’s both extremes, but I believe in the end it’s consistent work and the determination to see an idea to it’s end, no matter how crap the product, with the faith that it’s still practice and it still counts.

How does Hong Kong influence your writing?
It upsets me. It’s not exactly an ideal place, though it is idolised when it comes to safety, or the MTR or cheap, delicious food. I think a lot of writing, especially in English, when it comes to Hong Kong, attempts to focus on defining the place with the awareness that it’s unique. So that enough readers not familiar with it will find it compelling, it’s like travel writing.

I don’t want to write like that. I think there is a lot of isolation, a lot of unhealthy relationships, toxicity and loneliness here and I think that this is far from limited to this city.

I try to find the universal in the specific, rather than denying what is universal by focusing on the specific. Hong Kong, in the context of us as a species, is a remarkable trailer of a future to come. It has one of the largest income gaps in the world, a disgusting amount of people living in poverty juxtaposed with stratospheric decadence, rampant pollution and corporate-timescale-level-thinking (that is, in quarters, which is somewhat problematic when it comes to climate change), the highest average IQ and life expectancy in the world, cutting edge technology harnessed to make you buy shit you do not need, and a disturbingly high suicide rate among children who don’t fit the requisite mould.

I grew up here and frankly it makes me angry. I also love it, it is my home, and I’ve written celebratory pieces about it too. This is too big of a question to answer; how does Hong Kong influence my writing? If I have to sum it up, I’d say as a living computer I am forced to process it in all it’s neon madness, and that I’d hate to write about fields full of sheep instead.

The amount of silence in such a noisy place is mind boggling. So few people have an actual voice, instead we are bombarded with manicured ads and artificial TV shows claiming to define our existence in Hong Kong. Everywhere you look in Hong Kong, on the walls, on buildings, on magazine covers everywhere, there are words telling you how to be or think, via telling you what to buy, or what is considered of value and this gets to people, this affects us.

In Hong Kong, I try to consider what isn’t being said, but from my very, very narrow perspective. There’s a hell of a lot of noise here. I think a lot of writing at the moment is focused on articulating a perspective that can then be cozily placed in a category like ‘culture’ or ‘gender’ or some space from which the consumer and creator can feel comfortable in being associated with.

What is lost in that movement is the attempt to discover the universal, or even admitting that the state of us as a globalised species, like our genes, is 99.5% similar and cultural fetishisation for the sake of it is a form of self-inflicted blindness.

Hong Kong as an influence, is a noisy place, which inspires me by refusing to keep things simple or quiet, even if most people are rendered silent by it. Mental health is a box I’d like to say I try to fit a lot of my writing into- the state of Hong Kong’s popular perception, treatment and education when it comes to mental health is an absolute disgrace.

Google the government website on mental health, there’s a questionnaire for depression and if you succeed, if you have symptoms that fulfil the requirements for a diagnoses, the website effectively tells you to ‘take it easy’. There’s barely any help. It’s an absolute disgrace, and it’s not the rich that are being let down, they can afford private treatment, it’s the larger majority that have to count on a government doctor with ten minutes every two weeks to see you and the popular stigma that you can’t talk about these things.

The social environment is, in many ways, psychologically toxic. That said I have it easy compared to most people, I’m aware of that, I try to stay aware of my privilege. But the BS is dripping from the walls.

Poem:

Things I wish were or that I could see in the city but don’t because the world is not moulded by the whims of my imagination.

Like when I stop,
Like when I pause, to give a beggar change,
Another hard-eyed walker strides towards us,
He’s from this mangled person’s mysterious past.
He’s got a deformed limb,
He’s engaging in disabled kung fu,
Flipping around on one functional leg,
And beating the shit out of this guy wearing a suit.

Is that as offensive as ignoring him?

At least in my fantasies I pretend to care.

Behind an office lady’s perfume trail,
I surf a happy wake- wish it was colored,
Maybe purple, so I can
Hmmm
Sniff the smell of happy.
It’s not stalking, going in the same direction,
It’s not like there’s any space on the escalator.
See the perfectly looking douchey guy in the suit,
See the way too sultry blouse wearing office girl,
See them engage in Mortal Kombat.

A look passes between them,
Sudden recognition,
Eyes flare
An accusatory YOUUU
One person kicks / the streets clear,
To form an orderly circle.
They pose,
I become one of those dudes in the backdrop,
Moving my hands up and down,
Like in the Super Street fighter backgrounds.

Outside the Landmark,
Fenced-in trees inhale car fumes,
Like hardened smokers talking shit to one another,
About how dumb humans are.
You know the waterfront used to be right by my roots.
Yeah thank the Sun they covered that stuff with concrete. Smelled horrific.

Sometimes on a skyway,
When a double decker passes so close,
I think of jumping, and rolling, then running on the roofs,

But I’d need something to escape from for it to make sense.
Like reality.
Or something to chase.
Like office ladys.

How about the neon signs,
Unravelling to become neon snakes,
They float through the sky like Doctor Who monsters,
Neon eels,
If they touch you, they either electrocute, or seduce,

And next thing you know you’re in a Wanchai strip club being choked to death
By the fairy lights.

I want a class one Tai Tai laden down with shopping bags,
Wearing Armani everything and sunglass occluded eyes,
To walk into HSBC,
Chill as fuck,
And from her shopping bags drop,
Two tommy guns.
With perfect diction, her lines would be:
Everyone be cool this is a robbery.
Any of you pricks move and I’ll execute every last mother fucking one of you.
In my fantasies I don’t bother not to plagiarise,
This is why copyright is unnatural,
Her lipstick is as red as the HSBC logo,
Or the dead kids those terrorists they accidentally funded killed.

Oops, too far, good thing none of this is real.

The Victoria Harbour channel monster would be unfathomable.
Doubly terrifying because of the layers of nasty that film the water,
Would make it invisible till it was a few feet from the surface,
Armoured in plastic bags, translucent scales that warp the image underneath,
Lovecrafted out of Vita Box cartons that inflate and deflate as it breathes,
It’s touch is asthma,
It’s straw appendages piercing skin to suck out all your dreams,
Right through your pupils,
You won’t be able to get a good night’s sleep again,
It will find you in every toilet bowl and stagnant puddle,
The urban mosquitos are it’s eyes.

Skyscrapers are secret spaceships,
Rocket boosters buried in the concrete,
Waiting for the signal,
They lift up all at once,
Hidden steel shutters locking down windows,
For the inevitable space exodus.

Inevitable, in my fantasies at least.

Maybe they are missiles,
Anti-alien weapons,
Filled with angry bankers coked up like Viking berserkers, unable to distinguish friend,
From the ignorant average person investing with them,
They take their ties off, tying to them stationary,
Wielding silken nunchucks against the bugger ships they board,
The antennas and weird spiral shit on roofs were always
Disguised ramming prows.

If all the cars, lorrys and bus’s horned at once,
Would the sound blow out all the buildings glass?
If the PLA in admiralty took on the cops,
Would the triads decide a tie breaker?
I want a crazy brown guy to walk into a crystal shop,
With a tennis racket,
And systematically smash everything at once,
Then maybe buy it all afterwards,

Take that mainland billionaires.

I’m a fucked up patriot in my head.

I want to see ten thousand people take to the streets,
Yelling slogans from the 1970s,
I want to sit cross legged in the middle of the highway
While the Hong Kong police go full police state
And radical students are threatened with pepper spray,
Would be cool to feel a part of history,
Especially to be on the losing side.

I want graffiti on the government buildings,
And street art outside the IFC,
I want a declaration that anyone can be Batman,
Hanging from a skyway.
I want to see it again,
And pretend that a seven million strong city,
Educated and liberal,
Could field one hell of an army
For change.
For a change,
I want my fantasies to be real,

Also
I don’t think theres anything wrong with having an office girl fetish,
I mean I grew up in Hong Kong.
It’s not my fault.
That I want you
to give me
a raise.

Peel Street Poetry is an open mic poetry night at Orange Peel. It runs every Wednesday of the month except the first. The environment is friendly and they love new performers, so come share your poetry or just listen along to some of Hong Kong’s sharpest poetic talents.

Peel Street Poetry Open Mic
Date: 2nd, 3rd, 4th (and 5th) Wednesdays of the month
Venue: Orange Peel
Tickets: Free
More info:
www.peelstreetpoetry.com

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Dragonland: 24-26 February, 2017

Dragonland 2017

In what’s likely to be an increasing trend, with the massive costs of building a stage and installing a sound system, a one night Leon’s Penguins concert has morphed into Dragonland, a three day music festival.

Dragonland will take place on the Central Harbourfront from the 24-26 February 2017. The mixed line up features a local superstar, international dj’s and a mix of well known bands headlined by the Black Eyed Peas.

One of the four ‘heavenly kings’ of Canto-Pop Leon Lai returns to the Central Harbourfront on the 24 February, with a hopefully fire-proof marque, for a one night gig Leon’s Penguins.

Day two of Dragonland is a ‘Night of Dance’ headlined by international DJs Zedd and Steve Aoki with Redfoo, Tom Swoon, Vinai, Infected Mushroom and Seiho performing throughout the day.

Dance segues into a ‘Night of Pop’ headlined by the returning Black Eyed Peas, Iggy AzaleaCarly Rae JepsenMike PosnerHalf the Animal.

Leon is a consummate performer and will doubtless put on another great show, but the thought of a full lineup Black Eyed Peas, with even a passingly good sound-system, outdoors and backdropped by Victoria Harbour… Wicked!

Dragonland 2017

Dragonland
When:
 24-26 February, 2017
Where: Central Harbourfront
How much: $1,680, $1,380, $880, $780 per day – tickets onsale 30 November, 2016 from Hotdogtix
More info:
24 Feb – Leon’s Penguins
25 Feb – Dragonland – One Night Dance: Zedd, Steve Aoki, Redfoo, Tom Swoon, Vinai, Infected Mushroom, Seiho
26 Feb – Dragonland – One Night Pop: Black Eyed Peas, Iggy Azalea, Carly Rae Jepsen, Mike Posner, Half the Animal

leons_penguins_concert2017

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