The Hong Kong Three Sisters

The emptiness of Hong Kong people’s life will go naked in Alice Theatre Laboratorys anatomy of Chekhov’s The Three Sisters. The Hong Kong Three Sisters is a highly localised fusion of Hong Kong and the essence of the classic Russian play.

Adapted by Director Andrew Chan who commented “There is a glimpse of hope shown in Chekhov’s characters’ minds. In contrast, our life in Hong Kong has lost its balance in recent years, there is a lack of direction within the region and the things people used to strive for are realistically now beyond them.”

“Modern Hong Kong is the backdrop to this creative interpretation” continued Chan, “Chekhov captured the average Russian’s lifestyle a century ago.” Seasoned by minimalism, The Hong Kong Three Sisters is ‘molecular gastronomic dish’, which is the sublimation of Chekhov’s ideas in a post-modern presentation devised by Chan or as he puts it “A “molecular” presentation that aims to reveal the status quo of the Hong Kong people today.”

Ahead of it’s World Premiere in January bc magazine spoke to Director Andrew Chan and actress Chan Shui Yu (Olga/Alice) about the new minimalist production.

Director Andrew Chan

Why did you choose a minimalist approach to the play?
From time to time, there is discussion among directors in Hong Kong about using a bare stage or very few props. They are regarded as minimalists. I have been wondering whether this artistic approach, which originated in the 60s and 70s, is that simple. German architect Ludwig Miles van der Rohe says, “Less is more.” I have been thinking over how much means “less” and how much means “more”. I like learning new ideas and believe the world of knowledge has no borders. That is why I take every project or performance as a learning opportunity, which lets me wander on a theatrical journey among different artistic forms and styles. This journey is an expedition in the realm of “minimalism”.

What attracted you to Chekov’s The Three Sisters?
“Minimalism is Talent’s sister.” This is what Russian novelist and playwright Anton Chekhov once said. Owing to this quotation, I linked minimalism with his works and read them again. In terms of conciseness, his novellas are the best. In his condensed writings, the ordinary, vulgar and deplorable life in the Tsardom of Russia is vividly revealed. Each story is a picture illustrating the joy and sorrow of life.

My favourite Chekhov’s play is actually The Seagull. Yet, The Three Sisters touches me more deeply. Irina’s line “Moscow! Moscow! Moscow!” reminds me of the current situation in Hong Kong. The Three Sisters is a story before the October Revolution when people are facing the fall of the Empire and expecting the arrival of a new era.

They are like waiting in the dark before dawn and braving the great change with an anonymous pain in the heart. Aren’t we, Hong Kong people who are nostalgic for the “good old days”, facing various difficulties and braving the unforeseeable tomorrow? More than a century ago, the Russian three sisters could dream of Moscow, but now what can we dream of? Where can we go?

How Did The Hong Kong Three Sisters Evolve?
In the process of rehearsal, new ideas emerged and the play has evolved and branched out into the life of Hong Kong stage actors after they take their costumes off. There are a property agent, a podcast anchor of a conspiracy forum, an assistant professor of the Medicine Faculty, a tour guide and a spiritual counselor who are meeting different Hong Kong people with different problems. Their stories are actually like novellas which resemble the works by the contemporary American novelist Raymond Carver, who is known as “the American Chekhov”. Without redundant structure, his concise language leads readers to the core of the story directly and lets them experience the tension of the conflict that elicits no background nor ending. Only the selected part of the story is told. On our stage, there will be a few scenes like Carver’s novellas, illustrating no pretext nor resolution, but the very moment.

What Makes The Hong Kong Three Sisters Unique?
What makes The Hong Kong Three Sisters different from our previous productions is the way it lets you “escape” from reality but makes you “face” the reality. It is also dealing with complicated issues in a minimalist form.

Chan Shui Yu

What Attracts You to The Three Sisters
As a graduate from HKAPA, I am excited about the opportunity to perform classical plays, let alone the challenge of adapting a masterpiece, such as Chekhov’s The Three Sisters. From character analysis to adaptation, it has been a beautiful and pleasant journey. Like our previous performances, which were created by ensemble effort, this production is telling stories in a unique, organic and realistic way.

What parallels do you see between the play and Hong Kong today?
It was touching to read the script of Chekhov’s The Three Sisters as the story illustrates exactly Hong Kong’s environment and situation today. Even if we are proud of the good old days, we still need to carry on with best wishes. We believe the best is yet to come and our effort today will pay in the future and pave the way for our next generation.

Do you think that women today in Hong Kong face the same problems as those in Chekov’s time?
Chekhov’s works are universal. It seems women enjoy more freedom nowadays but still the women today are facing the same issues related to family, marriage, love and work like the women in the old days. We find the women today as strong and determined as the ones in The Three Sisters.

Chekhov’s works mainly deal with the social issues in Russia in the late 19th century, including the rise of businessmen, the fall of landlords and the social status before the October Revolution. In the meantime, his works also reveal the absurdity of the world today, the anxiety of our current life and the collapse of the old values. However, there is always hope in his works and the characters project an optimistic sense. His characters are stranded in the midst of joy and sorrow but still carry on bravely.

Through the play Chekov presents various opinions about what it is to live a good life. What do you think living a good life for a HK woman looks like today?
We would also like to find out the answer. Olga says in Act 4, “If only we knew, if only we knew!” But it is certain that we are all positive.

Character List
OlgaAlice  Chan Shui Yu
VershininKwong – Chau Ka Fai
AndreiAugust – Leung Chi Chung Eric
TuzenbachDamon – Lai Ho Yin Desmond
MashaSue – Fung Siu Shan Phoebe
NatashaHilda – Yuen Wai Ying Grace
IrinaKitty – Chan Hui Yan Candy

Director: Chan Hang Fai Andrew
Playwright: Anton ChekhovDevised by Alice Theatre Laboratory

The Hong Kong Three Sisters
Alice Theatre Laboratory
When:
6-8 January, 2017
Where: HK Cultural Centre, Studio Theatre
How much: $200, $160 from Urbtix
More info:
Cantonese drama with Chinese and English surtitles
6–7 Jan, 2017 – 8pm
7–8 Jan, 2017 – 3pm

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The Hong Kong Three Sisters

The emptiness of Hong Kong people’s life will go naked in Alice Theatre Laboratory’s anatomy of Chekhov’s The Three Sisters. The Hong Kong Three Sisters is a highly localised fusion of Hong Kong and the essence of the classic Russian play that has it’s World Premiere in January 2017.

Adapted by Director Andrew Chan who commented “There is a glimpse of hope shown in Chekhov’s characters’ minds. In contrast, our life in Hong Kong has lost its balance in recent years, there is a lack of direction within the region and the things people used to strive for are realistically now beyond them.”

“Modern Hong Kong is the backdrop to this creative interpretation” continued Chan, “Chekhov captured the average Russian’s lifestyle a century ago.” Seasoned by minimalism, The Hong Kong Three Sisters is ‘molecular gastronomic dish’, which is the sublimation of Chekhov’s ideas in a post-modern presentation devised by Chan or as he puts it “A “molecular” presentation that aims to reveal the status quo of the Hong Kong people today.”

The Hong Kong Three Sisters is also the concluding production of the Theatrical Minimalism Exploration Project, which has conducted a series of seminars, workshops and showcases examining minimalism in detail over the last two years. The production explores Minimalist Theatre through disintegrating and reassembling a masterpiece in the post-modern approach with the injection of naturalistic performance, Brecht’s alienation effect and the imagery language of the stage.

Presented by Alice Theatre Laboratory (ATL) and financially supported by the Arts Capacity Development Funding Scheme of the Government of the HKSAR, The Hong Kong Three Sisters will première in the Studio Theatre of Hong Kong Cultural Centre before touring Asia and Europe between May and September 2017.

Cast: Chan Shui Yu, Chau Ka Fai, Leung Chi Chung Eric, Lai Ho Yin Desmond, Fung Siu Shan Phoebe, Yuen Wai Ying Grace and Chan Hui Yan Candy

Director: Chan Hang Fai Andrew
Playwright: Anton ChekhovDevised by Alice Theatre Laboratory

The Hong Kong Three Sisters
Alice Theatre Laboratory
When:
 6-8 January, 2017
Where: HK Cultural Centre, Studio Theatre
How much: $200, $160 from Urbtix
More info:
Cantonese drama
6–7 Jan, 2017 – 8pm
7–8 Jan, 2017 – 3pm

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What are The Colours of Humanity?

white-room-1

What are The Colours of Humanity? This is the intriguing question posed by the International Black Box Festival 2016 (ibb2016) which aspires that audiences immerse themselves in different artistic realms to discover the many colours of humanity. Organised by the Hong Kong Repertory Theatre the festival runs from 15 October to 20 November and features productions encompassing a wide range of styles each presenting a different approach to the dramatic text.

HK Repertory Theatre’s Artistic Director Anthony Chan commented, “These six highly anticipated productions are all stylistically unique. We live in an age of complicated emotions and relationships that affect not only the nature of human connection but also our thinking beyond national boundaries. We aim to provide our audience with a wide vista where imagination and creativity roam free among the many facets of our collective, civilized spirit.”

descendants-of-the-eunuch-admiral-photo1

The curator of ibb2016 Fung Wai Hang explains this year’s focus. “For the inaugural Black Box Festival we chose the theme of ‘body and movement’, while this year we focus on the ‘dramatic text’. In recent years, different approaches to the dramatic text have surfaced. We hope to establish a platform for international exchange, so that our local theatre professionals and enthusiasts can enjoy an enriching encounter with visiting artists through workshops and lectures.”

International Black Box Festival 2016 Programme

La Voix Humaine – Toneelgroep Amsterdam (Netherlands)
15-17 April, 2016 @ HK City Hall, Theatre
During an hour-long performance, a woman is trapped inside a box-like room, holding onto the receiver talking to her ex-lover. For the entire hour, the audience watches her in this emotional roller-coaster ride, becoming de facto “peeping toms”. La voix humaine was written by Jean Cocteau and directed by 2016 Tony Award-winning director Ivo van Hove. (Note this production took place in April).

Descendants of the Eunuch Admiral – Performer Studio (Hong Kong)
15-23 October @ HKRep Black Box
A classic work by the founding father of Singapore theatre Kuo Pao-kun, this play addresses power politics as well as castration, depicting Zheng He’s seven ocean voyages as well as the eunuch admiral’s physical and psychological challenges. It provides a parable on the pressures of modern life, where people are left with little choice: either self-castration or being castrated by others. Descendants of the Eunuch Admiral was written by Kuo Pao-kun, adapted and directed by Tony Wong.

the-9-fridas-photo-1

The 9 Fridas – Möbius Strip Theatre (Wales, Taiwan, Hong Kong)
27-30 October @ HKRep Black Box
The 9 fridas is a mosaic combining a patchwork of impressions and stories depicting the life of Mexican artist Frida Kahlo (1907–1954), with characters and their stories echoing the real life of Kahlo herself. The 9 fridas was written by Kaite O’Reilly and directed by Phillip Zarrilli, renowned for his psychophysical acting method.

Asagao – Bkyuyugekitai (Japan)
3-6 November @ HKRep Black Box
Asagao was created especially for the International Black Box Festival by Shed Skin playwright Tsukuda Norihiko, who not only wrote the script but also appears in the production. The story takes place after a husband returns after a six-month stint working away from home to discover a deserted house where morning glory vines have overtaken the walls and even the ceiling. Where is his wife? The story crosses time and space incorporating absurdist elements, humour and irony, at the same time; it is tinged with a sense of helplessness. Asagao is directed by Kamiya Shogo.

White Room – White Room Research Collective (Japan, Hong Kong)
10-13 November @ HKRep Black Box
Created and directed by Waguri Yukio, disciple of Butoh founder Hijikata Tatsumi and principal dancer of Asbestos-kan, White Room combines butoh and text in expressing the hearts and desire of seven patients. Written and directed by Waguri Yukio.

before-after-3

Before After – Creative VaQi (South Korea)
17-20 November @ HKRep Black Box
Divided into sections based on time, Before After shows the changes that occur before and after a devastating event. A time before and after is created after a tragic, irreversible event. What experiences do we go through that make us realise that an event has affected ‘our’ lives? What happens as a point in ‘my’ time on stage suddenly meets ‘yours’ space. Before After is a collective work directed by Kyung-sung Lee.

The International Black Box Festival 2016 also includes workshops, talks and a symposium hosted by artists from around the world. Speakers at these events include Theatre du pif’s Artistic Director Bonni Chan, Japanese butoh master Waguri Yukio, Professor Winton Au, Professor Chiu Chui-de, Kaite O’Reilly, Tony Wong, Tsukuda Norihiko and Kyung-sung Lee. For more information on workshops, talks and symposium visit the festival’s website www.hkrep.com/ibb2016.

white-room-2

International Black Box Festival 2016
Date: 15 October – 20 November, 2016
Venue: HK Rep Black Box Theatre
Tickets: $280 from Urbtix

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10th Chinese Drama Festival

mother courage

The Chinese Drama Festival (CDF) is a drama extravaganza in Chinese organised roughly every two years by China, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau. 2016 is the tenth festival and runs from the 2-24 April. Previous festivals have been hosted in Beijing (1996), Hong Kong (1998 & 2007), Taipei (2000 & 2009), Macau (2002 & 2011), Kunming (2004), and Hangzhou (2014).

The CDF features ten drama productions by local and international theatre companies, a series of Chinese drama seminars. Here’s a synopsis of the drama productions:

Footprints in the SnowFootprints in the Snow (Opening Production)
Legendary Cantonese opera playwright Yip Fei Hung in his last letter to his son Eric, reveals his yet-to-be-produced script, currently hidden in “Ying Seung”(“congealed box”). In search of the script, Eric recollects more about his father’s life and love, and also an ambiguous relationship with a retired male actress. Discover the playwright’s unrevealed sensation and his unique artistic vision through his footprints.

Footprints in the Snow
Hong Kong Repertory Theatre
Date: 2-13 April, 2016
Venue: HK City Hall, Theatre
Tickets: $300, $250, $180 from Urbtix
More info: 2, 3, 5-6, 7, 8-9,11-13 April – 7:45pm; 3 April – 2:45pm

The CaptainThe Captain
A large-scale original production presented by the the Shanghai Dramatic Arts Centre which focuses on raising awareness of the environment and heritage preservation.
The Captain
Shanghai Dramatic Arts Centre
Date: 8pm, 14-16 April, 2016
Venue: Tsuen Wan Town Hall, Auditorium
Tickets: $280, $200, $140 from Urbtix
More info: In Putonghua with Chinese surtitles

Life After Life
An Infusion of Zhuangzi’s philosophy into contemporary story through a re-interpretation of Taoist classic anecdotes:

The present: Assistant professor Zhuang Sheng deciphers the book of Zhuangzi and finds the world of pre-Qin philosopher Zhuang Zhou becomes clearer…

Warring States Period: The resigned Zhuang Zhou fakes his death to escape from troubles, but life has changed completely when he wakes up…

Life After LifeThe life of Zhuangzi of ancient times and Zhuang Sheng of modern times overlap. What would they choose and give up facing lust, fame and wealth? Who could tell if Zhuang Sheng enters the world of Zhuang Zhou, or Zhuang Zhou dreams of Zhuang Sheng from more than 2,000 years later?

As reflected in “Zhuang Zhou’s Butterfly Dream”: is Zhuang dreaming that he is a butterfly, or is the butterfly dreaming that it is Zhuang? Two “Mr. Zhuang”s; one new story.

Life After Life
8CM Drama Factory and Jalent (Beijing) Culture Communication Co. Ltd
Date: 8-10 April, 2016
Venue: HK Cultural Centre, Studio Theatre
Tickets: $280, $180 from Urbtix
More info: 8-9 April – 8pm; 9-10 April 3pm

Nowhere NearNowhere Near
A revelation of the concealed brutality in a family through physical theatre. At the New Year reunion after a funeral, the mere distance of a dining table makes members of a closely-knitted family seem distant and estranged, wounds hidden under the dining table are about to be torn apart.

Nowhere Near
M.O.V.E Theatre (Taiwan)
Date: 8-10 April, 2016
Venue: Tsuen Wan Town Hall, Auditorium
Tickets: $280, $200, $140 from Urbtix
More info: 8-9 April – 8pm; 9-10 April – 2:30pm; In Putonghua with Chinese surtitles

MacbethMacbeth
Macbeth does murder sleep… a rendition of Shakespeare’s classic tale in Cantonese. After a victory, King Duncan’s foremost general, Macbeth, is confronted by three demons who prophesy that Macbeth will soon become King, and the heirs of his best friend, Banquo, will become kings after Macbeth’s death.

Spurred on by his powerful wife and his own ambition, Macbeth murders King Duncan and seizes the throne. Macbeth has Banquo murdered but Banquo’s son escapes – as does King Duncan’s son, Prince Malcolm. Then Macbeth murders the wife and son of General Macduff who, in turn, wants revenge

Macbeth
Date: 7:45pm, 13-14 April, 2016
Venue: Ko Shan Theatre New Wing, Auditorium
Tickets: $160, $120 from Urbtix
More info: In Cantonese with Chinese and English surtitles

A Doomed BugA Doomed Bug
One night, in a canton coffee shop at the back lane of a casino, a misfortunate mob leader is enjoying his last supper, fried beef noodles, in an unauthorized secret room. But a running woman and a reckless student make the supper complicated.

Just as the smuggling boat has been waiting and the escaping time is running close, there come a team of police and an undocumented worker. But the secret room make no way to escape. Everyone was thinking how to leave this canton coffee shop secretly. However, the situation has just got out of control.

A Doomed Bug
Macau Hiu Kok Drama Association
Date: 8-11 April, 2016
Venue: HK Repertory Theatre Black Box
Tickets: $160 from Urbtix
More info: 8-9, 11 April – 8pm; 10 April – 3pm; In Cantonese

NitehawkNitehawk
This is just an ordinary family, one you can find anywhere, one that talks but never communicates, one whose members keep on wishing time would pass quietly so that when the end comes, they can bowl over everything and start all over again. And yet, every night, the nitehawk’s cries outside the window are stirring up the sleeping, repressed cells in their bloodline.

Nitehawk
Drama Gallery
Date: 8-10 April, 2016
Venue: Shatin Town Hall, Cultural Activities Hall
Tickets: $180 from Urbtix
More info: 8-10 April – 8pm; 9-10 April – 3pm; In Cantonese

Mother Courage in ChinaMother Courage in China
Survival is only possible with courage. In the days of the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms (AD 907-960), war seemed to be endless. Mother Courage was carrying her cart together with her three children, selling everyday items to make a living. She was afraid of war, but even more the end of it. Surviving war with her children was not easy, making a living after war did not seem to be easier…To survive, there is nothing more to rely on except courage.
This masterpiece of Brecht is not only a story of a courageous mother but also of universal value. Following The Chalk Circle in China, Class 7A Drama Group is again going to revise Brecht’s work into ancient China context.

Mother Courage in China
Class 7A Drama Group
Date: 8-10 April, 2016
Venue: Ngau Chi Wan Civic Centre, Theatre
Tickets: $240, $180 from Urbtix
More info: 8-10 April – 7:30pm; 9-10 April – 2:30pm; In Cantonese

Will You Please Be Quiet?Will You Please Be Quiet, Please?
An adaptation of three selected works by Raymond Carver which explores the coincidence and turns in everyday life. The husband has been lying on the couch since unemployed, by then his wife observes life starts to get rotten, like food in their fridge. Hit by the sudden death of their son, the couple immense themselves in grief and fluster, until a baker irritates them with calls. A man, alone and lonely while his wife is away, gets a call and an invitation from a woman who dials the wrong number. Carver is often regarded as the ‘American Chekhov’ for his depiction of nobodies with strong humanity. The characters lives are immersed in mundanity and difficult relationships, but at the same time lack a sense of vitality

Will You Please Be Quiet, Please?
Piece by Piece
Date: 1-3 April, 2016
Venue: HK Repertory Theatre Black Box
Tickets: $180 from Urbtix
More info: 1-2 April – 8pm; 2-3 April – 3pm; In Cantonese

GweiloGweilo
Novelist Martin Booth came to settle in British colony Hong Kong in the 50s when his father was assigned here with the British army. His childhood coincided with the emergence and growth of Hong Kong as one of the most prosperous metropolises in the world. He has a direct experience of East meeting West. In 2002, diagnosed with brain cancer he wrote a a memoir about his unforgettable relationship with the city. He died shortly after he finishing Gweilo.

Although Hong Kong is no longer a colony, this history is part of our present identity. In the last hundred years, there have been a number of people with similar experience of Martin Booth. Based upon Gweilo, we will look for similar stories to enrich the original story and create a new bilingual solo performance and examine the distinctive colonial history of Hong Kong through the lens of a golden boy.

Gweilo
Pants Theatre Production
Date: 15-24 April, 2016
Venue: HK Repertory Theatre Black Box
Tickets: $220 from Urbtix
More info: 15-16, 18, 21-23 April – 8pm; 16-17, 23-24 April – 3pm; In Cantonese and English

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Kennedy – World Premiere

Kennedy - 2016

It’s not often we have the World Premiere of a stage show in Hong Kong, especially one that is written and produced in English by HongKongers. But that’s what you’ll be able to see this week at the HK Arts Centre as José Manuel Sevilla’s new play Kennedy has it’s World Premiere under the production and direction of Adam Harris.

Written by the award-winning Spanish poet José Manuel Sevilla who penned the local production of The Bridge in 2011, Kennedy is a noirish tale of loss and redemption set in late 20th Century Barcelona. Recently released from prison, Kennedy seeks his sister, Beatriz. Both escape from the reality of their lives into philosophical flights of fancy that keep the shadows at bay.

bc spoke to José Manuel Sevilla and Adam Harris about Kennedy which has as Adam puts it “Strong strong adult themes, language” and nudity” not Harris hastens to add his…

José Manuel Sevilla – Playwright

How do u feel when the world premiere of a show approaches?
Nervous but déjà vu type nervous; back to the pure, simple excitement of the first things in life – rejuvenating.

Are you very hands off once you find a producer, or do you like to be involved in the production?
Totally hands off, I want to be in both sides and feel like both a creator and the public, it is part of the excitement.

Do you feel your works are open to wide interpretation, or do you have a very fixed idea in your mind as to how the work should look on stage?
When I write I actually transcript on a paper a play that is represented in my head, that is already an interpretation. Directors and actors take my words and put them in their lips, they give them sound and thought and gesture: all acts of living are a sort of interpretation.

Of the various stage interpretations of your works, which have you enjoyed most and which have you gone wow didn’t see it that way?
What I enjoy most is precisely when I go wow didn’t see it that way, that’s is the origin of learning. I may disagree but it’s still learning.

Do you enjoy watching your words live on stage?
Even more than the words, my biggest joy is the “room” that is created on the stage, the complicities that invite me to enter a special place and time that lives for 90 minutes, the faces, the movements, the feelings. I know the words already, I want to be surprised by the unique silent movie around them just with a simple ticket.

adam-harrisAdam Harris – Director

Did you approach José or did he approach you about staging Kennedy?
José approached me following my staging of his play The Bridge in 2011. The working relationship was established back then.

What attracted you to staging Kennedy?
On first reading it, did you ‘see it’ visually take shape in your mind? I do enjoy walks on the dark side – and this is a play that may be called “heavy” in popular parlance. A look at my recent productions – Macbeth, Medea and Frozen for example – testify to this. However, Kennedy has an element of ethereal, dream-like beauty to it. It is a play in which light and shade are balanced. When first reading it, yes, certain images suggested themselves, some of which stuck.

Any pressure from the author to stage the show as he envisioned it?
Absolutely none. As with The Bridge, José gave me the script and said “do what you will with it”. He is very particular about not being involved in the process of turning a script into a performance.

How do you feel about staging a World Premiere?
It is exciting to know that this is a new thing, an entirely new thing. A sense of responsibility of course, like that felt by a midwife bringing a life into the world.

Are there any differences in preparing and creating a show that’s never been performed before?
You are freed of prior conceptions in the audience’s minds about how the play should be. This is quite empowering. On the box office front, regrettably an unknown play can expect to do less well. People in Hong Kong are so busy that the name Coward, Wilde or Albee may catch their eye. New work is less supported in Hong Kong than in should be.

Kennedy
Date: 8pm, 17-19 March, 2016
Venue: HK Arts Centre, McAulay Studio
Tickets: $200/$180 from Urbtix

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Kennedy

stylus - Kennedy - 2016

Written by the award-winning Spanish poet José Manuel Sevilla who penned the Hong Kong production of The Bridge in 2011, Kennedy is a noirish tale of loss and redemption set in late 20th Century Barcelona. Recently released from prison, Kennedy seeks his sister, Beatriz. Both escape from the reality of their lives into philosophical flights of fancy that keep the shadows at bay.

This Stylus Productions staging of Kennedy is the world premiere of Sevilla’s latest work.

José Manuel Sevilla is a Barcelona born poet living in Hong Kong who has published several volumes of poetry including From the Limits of Paradise (1991), Contiguous Traject (1993), Alicia in Ikea’s Catalogue (2004) and Ashes of Auschwitz and Eighteen Dogs (2009). He founded ‘Poets against AIDS’ in Spain and, while living in Mexico, Sevilla started the photograph collection Street Language, which was exhibited at the Fringe Club in 2004.

Stylus Productions was founded in 2006 by Adam Harris; their previous shows include The Rocky Horror Show (2006 & 2010), the world premiere in English of The Bridge (2011, also by the award-winning Spanish poet José Manuel Sevilla), Macbeth (2014), Chimes of Freedom (2009) and last year’s Medea.

WARNING: This show includes adult language and themes.

Kennedy
Date: 8pm, 17-19 March, 2016
Venue: HK Arts Centre, McAulay Studio
Tickets: $200/$180 from Urbtix

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To Be Continued

To Be Continued
Cheung Yik Tung
When: 27-29 August, 2015
Where:
 Fringe Club, Fringe Upstairs
Tickets:
 $140 from HKTicketing
More info:
27 August 2015 (Thu) at 8:30pm
28 August 2015 (Fri) at 8:30pm
29 August 2015 (Sat) at 2:30pm, 7pm & 8:30pm
(In Cantonese)

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